Alaska Cruisetour

Holland American Line on the

MS Westerdam

May 20, 2020

12 Days / 11 Nights

(Fairbanks to Vancouver)

Fairbanks, Alaska ~ Denali National Park, Alaska ~ Anchorage, Alaska ~ Seward (Anchorage), Alaska ~ Glacier Bay ~ Haines (Skagway), Alaska ~ Juneau, Alaska ~ Ketchikan, Alaska ~ Inside Passage ~ Vancouver, B.C.

Spend two nights at stunning Denali. Go deeper on an included Tundra Wilderness Tour. Cruise majestic Glacier Bay and explore Alaska's famed Inside Passage. Anchorage/Seward Cruisetrain included.


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Or scroll down for more details and day by day itinerary



Alaska Cruisetour

 

Holland America Line on the

MS Westerdam

May 20 - 31, 2020
12 Days / 11 Nights

(Fairbanks to Vancouver)

 

BOOK BEFORE OCTOBER 31, 2019 AND RECEIVE
$400 on-board credit per stateroom
Complimentary Pinnacle Grill Dinner
PLUS
Balcony and Suite guests receive Premium Internet Package!
*Applies to 1st and 2nd guests in cabin. Subject to capacity control*



 

 

Day 1

Fairbanks, Alaska

Arrive at your downtown hotel. Though much of Fairbanks today is an amalgam of modern shops and malls, its history is celebrated at the 18-hectare (44-acre) Pioneer Park, which includes a Gold Rush Town with 35 restored buildings. Fairbanks also preserved its City Hall, which now houses the Fairbanks Community Museum. The city’s location in Alaska’s interior makes it a gateway to the arctic, and in summer tourist boats run cruises along the Chena and Tanana rivers.

 

Days 2-3

Denali National Park, Alaska

Take a bus to Denali. Only Holland America Line offers up to three nights in Denali to really settle in and explore, and is the only cruise line to include the deeper Tundra Wilderness Tour into Denali National Park on all of their two- and three-night Denali Land+Sea Journey itineraries. Holland America Line’s new Denali Square at the McKinley Chalet Resort is the ultimate base camp for adventures to Denali, followed by relaxing evenings. Enjoy soaring views across the Nenana River into Denali National Park from virtually anywhere on this amazing property, as well as great dining, quality entertainment, and unique local shopping opportunities.

 

Day 4 

Anchorage, Alaska

This morning, board the luxurious domed rail cars of the McKinley Explorer bound for Anchorage. Much like Seattle, Anchorage is a place where you can find a coffee shop (or espresso shack) anywhere. Locals enjoy skijoring, a winter sport where a person is pulled on skis by one or more dogs or sometimes a horse. While some cities have deer, Anchorage has lots of moose, known for being a bit rambunctious (and should be steered clear of if seen wandering down a street). Anchorage is a city where you can see the northern lights—the aurora borealis—on a clear dark night, typically during colder months. There are also plenty of active things to do and attractions to hike, bike and see wildlife such as the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail or Flattop Mountain Trail inside Chugach State Park.

 

Day 5

Seward (Anchorage), Alaska

Enjoy a scenic rail journey along Turnagain Arm aboard the cruisetrain en route to Seward before embarking your ship. One of Southcentral Alaska’s oldest communities, Seward is ground zero for the Klondike Gold Rush's Iditarod National Historic Trail, a dogsled route that connected the Kenai Peninsula’s ice-free port with Nome during frontier-era winters. Today this mellow town welcomes visitors to Resurrection Bay and Kenai Fjords National Park, not to mention the 204-kilometer (127-mile) Seward Highway—honored as an All-American Road—stretching north to Anchorage. In town, favorite stops remain the Alaska SeaLife Center, a research aquarium open to the public, and the steep, stony 920-meter (3,018-foot) Mount Marathon, which hosts one of America’s oldest footraces each Fourth of July.

 

Day 6

At Sea

Seattle’s skyline quickly gives way to mist-shrouded islands, towering Douglas firs and rank upon rank of snow-gilded mountains. Eagles skim low over the water, competing with humpbacks and killer whales for the area’s abundant fish.

The truly deep tangle of trees begins in British Columbia: The world’s largest coastal temperate rain forest stretches from Vancouver Island and the Canadian mainland here up through Alaska’s panhandle. Glaciers sculpted this stunning wilderness; in fact, their high-water marks remain visible. The massive sheets of ice smoothed and rounded any terrain under a mile high. The peaks, sharp and craggy, slice the air at over 1,370 meters (4,495 feet) in height, give or take.

Glaciers remain a huge draw, of course, frosting mountain ranges and shearing icebergs into the ocean—watch for baby seals resting on them from May to early July! And don’t forget to survey beaches for coastal brown bears, which can grow up to three times bigger than inland grizzlies, thanks to all the available salmon.

Make sure to pack warm and waterproof gear, along with binoculars, so you can belly up to a railing and enjoy this magnificent beauty.

 

Day 7

Glacier Bay

Cruise the ice-studded fjords of this national treasure for a full eight hours as a Park Service Ranger narrates.

Frosted crags descend into mossy forests and a 457-meter-deep (1,500-foot-deep) fjord at this World Heritage Site, which is also one of the planet’s largest biosphere reserves. Stone, ice and water continue to collide, sculpting a dramatic landscape that is the crown jewel of southeastern Alaska’s natural wonders. The area’s first European explorer missed it all—but with good reason. When Captain George Vancouver sailed here in 1794, a vast shield of ice, more than 1,200 meters (3,937 feet) thick, dominated the area. In one of the fastest retreats on record, the glaciers shrank back 105 kilometers (65 miles) by 1916. The formerly glacier-squashed land is rebounding now, rising 30 millimeters (1.18 inches) each year. Visitors can observe this rebirth: A spruce-hemlock rain forest has sprouted near the mouth of Glacier Bay. Farther north, the more recently exposed land shows sharper edges and thinner vegetation. Still, it’s enough to encourage the return of wildlife, from bald eagles to bears, moose and humpback whales.

 

Day 8

Haines & Skagway, Alaska

Haines, Alaska

There’s a reason Haines is known as the adventure capital of Alaska. Although many cities in Alaska feel different than those in “the lower 48,” Haines is more unusual than most with its unique rustic feel. It’s almost as if time has stopped and chain stores, and even stoplights, haven’t infiltrated this town of 1,300 that once topped Outside magazine’s list of “20 Best Places to Live and Play.” In the late 1890s, when Jack Dalton turned an Indian trail into a tollway ($10 for four horses with an unloaded sled or wagon), the town emerged as a stop for prospectors headed to the Yukon for the Klondike Gold Rush. Decades later it became a logging town, before turning to tourism beginning in the 1970s. These days, Haines is known as a haven for artists and nature lovers and is visited by far fewer cruise ships than other Alaskan coastal cities. 
Haines is a hotspot for rafting and hiking, salmon-, halibut- and trout-fishing in the Chilkat River or kayaking on Chilkoot Lake—as well as heli-skiing in the winter. During the late fall and early winter, thousands of bald eagles migrate through this area to feed on the salmon, an event celebrated by the Alaska Bald Eagle Festival in November. The memory of prospector days lingers on with opportunities to pan for gold, while the Indian Arts gallery, with its totem pole carving studio, offers a glimpse of an even older Haines.

 

Skagway, Alaska

At the height of the Klondike Gold Rush, the port town of Skagway served as the primary gateway to the legendary gold fields, and quickly grew into Alaska’s largest settlement. It was then a raucous frontier hub packed with trading posts, saloons and guesthouses. As the gold rush faded into the 1900s, so did Skagway—but today it has been reinvigorated as a gateway for a new kind of visitor: those looking to explore Alaska’s colorful history, pristine wildlife and unrivaled natural beauty. At every turn, you’ll find yourself immersed in gold rush lore, from the infamous Red Onion Saloon that still keeps a pistol that Wyatt Earp left behind en route to the Klondike, to the White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad, a classic narrow-gauge railway that traverses rugged mountains and passes cascading waterfalls and towering glaciers as it connects Skagway to Whitehorse deep in the Yukon. Much of the town has been preserved as part of the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, where rangers offer free walking tours around the historic district. Here you’ll also find a vibrant local community, home to a rich collection of local galleries, curio shops and restaurants serving seafood plucked fresh from nearby waters.


Day 9

Juneau, Alaska

Enjoy a full day of exploring Alaska's capital-choose from exciting shore excursions and still have time to shop.

Juneau, Alaska may well be the most remote, most beautiful and strangest state capital in the United States. Surrounded by water, forest and mountain sights, visitors seeking things to do in Juneau indoors and outdoors can hike a glacier, eat fresh-caught fish on a seaside patio and tour a grand capitol building all in one day.The city itself is pleasant, but the real highlight of a visit to Juneau is tracking down some wildlife. You can hike up Mount Roberts to chance upon wild deer and bald eagles. Most sightseeing and whale-watching tours head north to Auke Bay—bring a good pair of binoculars to get the best view of these majestic and surprisingly graceful creatures. If you prefer land mammals, catch a floatplane to a nearby wildlife reserve such as Chichagof or Admiralty Island to spy some bears lolling around.The sleepy, misty city of around 32,000—mostly fishermen and small-business owners—has a frontier town vibe, but welcomes more than a million visitors each summer to its natural attractions, cementing Juneau as Alaska’s number-one tourist destination. 

 

Day 10

Ketchikan, Alaska

Explore this uniquely Alaskan port, famous for its rich native culture, salmon fishing, and scenic Misty Fjords

Alaska’s “First City” of Ketchikan is so named because it’s the first major landfall for most cruisers as they enter the picturesque fjords of the Inside Passage, where the town clings to the banks of the Tongass Narrows, flanked by green forests nurtured by abundant rain.Ketchikan has long been an important hub of the salmon-fishing and -packing industries—visitors can try their luck on a sportfishing excursion or simply savor the fresh seafood at one of the local restaurants. It is also one of the best spots along the Inside Passage to explore the rich cultural sights of Native Alaskan nations like the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian. You can see intricately carved totem poles at the Totem Heritage Center and Totem Bight State Park, while the attractions of Saxman Village just outside of Ketchikan offers the chance to see Tlingit culture in action, with working carvers and a dance show in the clan house. And leave time to explore the sights in the town itself, including historic Creek Street, a boardwalk built over the Ketchikan Creek, where you can shop for souvenirs, smoked salmon and local art, while exploring gold rush­–era tourist attractions like Dolly’s House Museum.

 

Day 11

Scenic Cruising The Inside Passage

Relax and enjoy a full day of scenic Inside Passage cruising and immerse yourself in Holland America Line elegance.

 

Day 12

Vancouver, B.C.

Your Land + Sea Journey concludes this morning in Vancouver.

 

 Starting from $4,330

Click here to view a printable version of this itinerary which includes all cabin category pricing

Book this Cruise!

To Book this Cruise Call :

Paige Robbins ~ 816-423-4086

To Book Online

If you are rooming with just 1 other person, you may make your reservation by booking online using the form below, if you wish.

Passengers who are traveling as single passengers in a cabin, or 3 or more passengers in the same cabin, please call Paige Robbins ~ 816-423-4086 for rates and to reserve your cabin.

Rates are:
Per person double occupancy and include roundtrip airfare from Kansas City, cruisetour, travel insurance, port charges, government fees, taxes, and transfers to/from ship. HOLLAND AMERICA LINE HAS ADVISED THAT ALL AIR PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND ARE NOT GUARANTEED UNTIL FULL PAYMENT HAS BEEN RECEIVED.

Cost of Your Trip:
$4,330.00
Initial Deposit:
$458.00
Click Here to View Insurance Benefits & Coverage Details

Deposit Form

An initial deposit of $458 per person double occupancy or $916 per person single occupancy is required in order to secure reservations and assign cabins. Final payment is due by January 20, 2020. Those who book early get the best prices, the best cabin locations, and their preferred dining times.

Required Information

This information is required to purchase a tour online. Please contact us if you have any questions.

(Exactly as printed on your passport)

The charge to change an incorrect name on documents is $150.00 including FedEx charges.

If you are traveling as a single or if there are more than two people in your cabin, please call Paige Robbins ~ 816-423-4086 for pricing and to make your reservation.

click here to book this cruise